Oct 20

Internet Explorer 5 and above

  1. Select Internet Options from the Tools menu.
  2. In Internet Options dialog box select the Security tab.
  3. Click the Custom Level… button. The Security Settings dialog box will pop up.
  4. Under Scripting category enable Active scripting.
  5. Click OK twice to close out.
  6. Click Refresh.

Internet Explorer 5.X for Mac OS X

  1. Select Preferences from the Explorer menu.
  2. Click the arrow next to Web Browser.
  3. Click Web Content.
  4. Under Active Content check Enable Scripting.
  5. Click OK.
  6. Click Refresh.

Internet Explorer 5 for Mac OS 9

  1. Select Preferences from the Edit menu.
  2. Click the arrow next to Web Browser.
  3. Click Web Content.
  4. Under Active Content check Enable Scripting.
  5. Click OK.
  6. Click Refresh.

Internet Explorer 4.X

  1. Select Internet Options from the View menu.
  2. Click the Security tab.
  3. Click Custom.
  4. Click Settings.
  5. Scroll down to locate Scripting.
  6. Click Enable for Active Scripting.
  7. Click OK.
  8. Click Reload.

Continue reading »

written by MG

Oct 15

Netmasks Expanded (/24 through /32)

Netmask 255.255.255.0 /24 (11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000)
1 subnet
LOW IP HI IP
x.x.x.0 x.x.x.255

Netmask 255.255.255.128 /25 (11111111.11111111.11111111.10000000)
2 subnets
LOW IP HI IP
x.x.x.0 x.x.x.127
x.x.x.128 x.x.x.255

Netmask 255.255.255.192 /26 (11111111.11111111.11111111.11000000)
4 subnets
x.x.x.0 x.x.x.63
x.x.x.64 x.x.x.127
x.x.x.128 x.x.x.191
x.x.x.192 x.x.x.255

Netmask 255.255.255.224 /27 (11111111.11111111.11111111.11100000)
8 subnets
x.x.x.0 x.x.x.31
x.x.x.32 x.x.x.63
x.x.x.64 x.x.x.95
x.x.x.96 x.x.x.127
x.x.x.128 x.x.x.159
x.x.x.160 x.x.x.191
x.x.x.192 x.x.x.223
x.x.x.224 x.x.x.255

Continue reading »

written by MG

Oct 04

VIRT stands for the virtual size of a process, which is the sum of memory it is actually using, memory it has mapped into itself (for instance the video card’s RAM for the X server), files on disk that have been mapped into it (most notably shared libraries), and memory shared with other processes. VIRT represents how much memory the program is able to access at the present moment.

RES stands for the resident size, which is an accurate representation of how much actual physical memory a process is consuming. (This also corresponds directly to the %MEM column.) This will virtually always be less than the VIRT size, since most programs depend on the C library.

SHR indicates how much of the VIRT size is actually sharable (memory or libraries). In the case of libraries, it does not necessarily mean that the entire library is resident. For example, if a program only uses a few functions in a library, the whole library is mapped and will be counted in VIRT and SHR, but only the parts of the library file containing the functions being used will actually be loaded in and be counted under RES.

written by MG

Oct 04

SSH as root to your server. DO NOT use telnet

#Type the following
wget ftp://ftp.pangeia.com.br/pub/seg/pac/chkrootkit.tar.gz

#Unpack the tarball using the command
tar xvzf chkrootkit.tar.gz

#Change to the directory it created
cd chkrootkit*

#Compile by typing
make sense

#To use chkrootkit, just type the command
./chkrootkit

#Everything it outputs should be ‘not found’ or ‘not infected’…

#Now,
cd ..

#Then remove the .gz file
rm chkrootkit.tar.gz

written by MG \\ tags: ,